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Profile: Eduardo Frajman

Professor Eduardo Frajman is a trilingual political science professor at Aurora University. He brings his experiences from abroad into the classroom and offers an interesting take on civic education.

Prior to moving to the United States in 1999, he lived in Costa Rica, Mexico and Israel. Frajman grew up in a small Costa Rican community, with a population of only 3,000 people; he found living in a small community “exhausting” and longed to “get out of there” immediately after high school graduation. Frajman is fluent in Spanish, Hebrew and English.

Prior to moving to the United States in 1999, he lived in Costa Rica, Mexico and Israel. Frajman grew up in a small Costa Rican community, with a population of only 3,000 people; he found living in a small community “exhausting” and longed to “get out of there” immediately after high school graduation. Frajman is fluent in Spanish, Hebrew and English.

His dedication to the Jewish faith is not difficult to understand, both maternal and paternal grandparents were Holocaust survivors. But growing up in an area where 90 percent of the population practices Christianity would cause an ethnic minority to feel isolated.

He resembled the typical high school graduate, in the sense that he planned on going away for college, but his plans did not include university pamphlets or campus visits. “We couldn’t afford for me to go to college in the United States” said Frajman.

In 1992, he entered Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel.

“Israel was a good option for me because my grandparents lived there.” Both his parents pursued careers in the scientific field he felt pressure to follow in their footsteps “I started my first year thinking I would be a marine biologist,” said Frajman. After finding out his course schedule included chemistry, physics and calculus, he quickly decided against it.

“I was always, very much into politics,” said Frajman. “So, it was very natural for me to go in that direction.” His family’s political involvement and participation played a significant role in his decision to pursue politics.

In the 1960s, Frajman’s parents were heavily involved in politics. His father grew up in Brazil and “was a part of the rebellion that fought against the dictatorship,” said Frajman. Eventually, his father fled the country.

Frajman lived in Israel for eight years and completed his bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophical studies. Upon completing three mandatory years of military service years in the Israeli air force he understood the importance of community service.

Aurora University has a strong emphasis on citizenship and being “part of a community at large,” says Frajman. “We want to teach them [students] that there are other things that they need to think about in order to be happy and well-rounded.”

During Frajman’s time in Israel, he met an American girl. The two managed to make the relationship work even after she moved back to the United States.

“We agreed that when I was done serving in the military I would come join her,” said Frajman. Now, the two have been married for 13 years and have two daughters Alicia, 7, and Eve, 3.